Graduate Degrees

Overview

The dual degree PhD program in Political Science between Columbia and Sciences Po is the first one of its kind between the two institutions. Building on a decade of strong existing collaboration between the two institutions through the Alliance Program, this dual degree will further their mission to extend their global engagement by supporting the international training and scholarly approach of a new generation of political scientists.

This dual degree program allows students to spend two years at the partner institution, during which students take courses, conduct research, write a dissertation under the direction of a joint CU-Sciences Po dissertation committee, and eventually become eligible for the PhD degrees of both institutions. Students will be granted with a unique opportunity to widen their knowledge of their discipline in a transatlantic environment, as well as pursuing their doctoral research under the supervision of transatlantic teams of excellence.

Curriculum

In addition to the regular requirements of all PhD students at their home institution, dual degree students who are selected for the program are eligible to leave for the partner institution provided they have completed all additional pre requirements related to the dual degree track. These pre-requirements include:

  • Successfully defending their dissertation proposal at the home institution before departure for the host institution;

  • Serving as a teaching assistant for two semesters (with exceptions for students who have secured outside funding).

Note: Some course waivers may also apply to dual degree students prior to departure for the host institution.

At the host institution

Requirements that dual degree students will need to meet to be eligible to a PhD degree in Political Science from both institutions include:

  • Taking four courses at the partner institution, including one field survey course and one course in methodology;

  • Passing these courses with honors (for Columbia students at Sciences Po) or passing the qualifying exam in their major field (for Sciences Po students at Columbia);

  • Presenting a research paper to the department of the host institution;

  • Defending their dissertation with a joint Columbia – Sciences Po committee, including a 100 page summary of their dissertation in English (for Sciences Po students) or French (for Columbia students)

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Please visit the Sciences Po website.

 

Introduction

The program consists of two years of law study at Columbia Law School, followed by one year of study in Paris at Sciences Po. At the end of the three years Columbia students will obtain the French Master's in Global Business Law, and the U.S. J.D.

The aim of this highly selective, multidisciplinary, and international diploma in Global Business Law is to provide a small number of lawyers and students with an in-depth theoretical and practical acquaintance with the nature and needs of the global market, in a manner that synthesizes law and political science while borrowing from the best of both civil and common law pedagogical techniques. Classes conducted by leading European experts from the prestigious Institut d'études politiques will provide Columbia students with a European perspective on international law and business issues. In addition to the faculty members from Sciences Po, professors from other leading law faculties in Europe will be invited as visiting professors.

Interactive, bilingual discussion, in small specially tailored groups is emphasized in the program. Participants will also have an opportunity to undertake a research paper that can be supervised by their home faculty or by a faculty member in Paris. Only 30 students will take part in the program each year:  10 from Sciences-Po, 10 from Panthéon-Sorbonne University, and 10 from a select group of American law school partners.

Curriculum at CLS

Students must take all required Foundation courses in their first year at Columbia Law School. In the second year, students must take 32 credits and are are required to consult with the Office of International Programs in the selection of courses. Students are expected to take all required Foundation courses during the 1L year, 32 law credits during the 2L year, and must meet all other requirements of the JD degree.  Students will receive 21 credits for coursework in Paris. Note that language courses and courses outside the law school are not counted toward the JD degree for students participating in double degree programs. Participation in this program is subject to a final review of the second year transcript. Moreover, all course selections for the 2L year must be approved by the Office of International Programs.

Developing your 2L Course Load

As students will be at Columbia for only two years, and must take 32 credits in the 2L year, their schedules will have the same priority as those in their 3L year. For this reason, students generally get what they request. However, there is no ranking in the drop and add period. Please read the guidelines below before completing any pre-registration forms -- it is important to plan out your schedule carefully.

  • Students should take a few U.S. law subjects, (e.g. corporations, evidence, federal income tax, federal courts, securities, administrative law, corporate tax, etc.). There is no required course beyond the first year curriculum, but you should take some of the basics, focusing on those courses that you will likely use in your future.

  • If participating in a journal, students should check with the Editor in Chief to ascertain whether they can participate in the journal in their third year and whether they will get credit for it. If you know that you will be getting 1 credit for journal work in your 3L year, you will only need to take 31 credits in the 2L year. Likewise, for those students who are in F-1 status and plan to use Curricular Practical Training (CPT) in the summer after the 2L year, you will have to register for independent or supervised research in the 3L year, and write a paper relating to your summer work. The credits related to the CPT should be subtracted from the 32 credits needed to be earned in the 2L year (see below about independent and supervised research quotas).

  • If you are writing a note for a journal, please make sure that you will get academic credit for the note. You may use the same paper for a seminar as for a journal note, or you may register for one or two points of supervised or independent research under the supervision of a faculty member. (See section on independent research).

  • If you are participating in EIP, you may want to have fewer points in the fall than in the spring semester -- interviews can cause students to miss many days of classes.

  • You may ask a professor to add an additional credit on to a seminar by writing a longer research paper. This may be better than adding an additional seminar for credits.

  • Because of the time commitment, it is not suggested that you take a clinic unless it relates directly to your field of study. If you do decide to register for a clinic, be careful regarding the number of credits you use -- there is a maximum of 12 clinic/supervised research credits that one may count toward the JD (see below about maximum number of clinical/supervised credits).

  • Avoid externships as they generally take up a great deal of time for very few credits.

  • Take note of corequisites and prerequisites. While professors are generally flexible in allowing students to fulfill a prerequisite with a corequisite, you do want to be careful that you are building a schedule that is not too demanding.

  • Be mindful of the number of seminars you take in a semester as they only give 2 credits and sometimes may be as much work as a 3-point lecture.

  • Do not only take courses that you think you should -- make sure that you are taking some courses that you are interested in and will enjoy.

  • You may take courses outside of the Law School only if they relate to your legal studies (language courses do not qualify). You will, however, need permission from Amanda Maurer to take courses outside of the Law School.

  • Make sure you have thought about where you will get your minor and major writing credits.

  • You must fulfill the professional ethics requirement at CLS in order to graduate.

  • You cannot work on the research project you intend to do in your third year, during your second year. The 3-point research project make build upon a current research paper, but you cannot use the same paper (or large portions of it) for the 3rd year requirement. You should develop the topic of your research while at Columbia, and approach a professor as early as possible to serve as the supervisor of the research.

  • VERY IMPORTANT: Make sure that you keep track of the number of Independent Research/Journal and Clinical/Supervised credits you have. There is a maximum of 3 independent/journal credits that may be used toward your degree requirements. Since JD/LLM candidates are required to complete a 3-credit research paper under the supervision of a CLS professor in their third year, students may want to reserve their independent credits for the 3L requirement. An alternative is to use supervised research which is under the same category as clinical hours (students may apply up to 12 clinical/supervised research credits toward the degree). However, it is up to the discretion of the professor to agree to call your research "supervised" as this entails more interaction and "contemporaneous discussion, review and evaluation". When you speak to professors about this, remind them that you can make phone calls to discuss research, send written reports, and return to New York during vacations for in-person consultations.

  • Students are encouraged to meet with Gail Heatherly or Ilene Strauss for JD advising.  For advising specific to the double degree program, please contact the International Programs Office.

Curriculum in Paris

The fall semester runs from early October to mid-January, but Sciences-Po offers a one-month optional French language program during the month of September. Some courses are taught only in English, others only in French, and a few in both English and French. In the first semester, students will take a total of 6 offerings, 4 mandatory and 2 optional. Students may also take a French language course (not for credit) in both the fall and spring semesters. The spring semester runs from mid-February to mid-June. The two graduates of the program were able to take the New York Bar and Sciences-Po will make every effort to give students early exams. However, students should expect to be in Paris through the first of June.

For the most up to date information, please visit the website.

How to apply 

APPLICATION PROCESS FOR U.S. STUDENTS

Columbia J.D. students apply in their first year of study. Students must submit a written application, a statement of purpose, a résumé, and a transcript from their first semester at Columbia. In April, applicants are informed if they have passed the initial screening. As this program is taught in both French and English, it is important that students have an intermediate or advanced level of French language. Interviews in English and French may be conducted with selected students. Students are selected on the basis of their academic record at Columbia, strength of their written statement, and professional and educational experience. Only two students will be selected.

CONTACTS

Audrey Baker, Program Manager, Double Degree, Global Alliance or Study Abroad - Columbia Law School
Phone: 212-854-8170
Email: ab602@columbia.edu

Overview

This year-long tripartite program allows up to 16 students from Columbia University to spend a semester abroad studying in a transatlantic cohort of students at two world-class law schools in Paris. The program starts in New York in the Fall semester when Global Alliance students from Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University Law School (Paris 1) and from Sciences Po Law School (Sciences Po) join their Columbia Law School counterparts in studying a specialized curriculum at the Law School. Afterwards, Columbia students and French students travel to Paris to spend the Spring semester continuing to follow the program’s curriculum there.

This course is designed for students who wish to strengthen their training through a semester abroad where they experience a different academic system. The aim of the program is to train future practitioners, academics, and executives to become specialists in global business law and governance.

Students who participate in the Paris Global Alliance program receive a certificate in global business law and governance in addition to the J.D. degree from Columbia Law School.

Curriculum

An integrated, English-language curriculum provides a dynamic mix of theory and practical insight. Many courses take the form of small seminars, fostering faculty-student interaction and the cross-cultural sharing of ideas. While the curriculum may vary slightly from year to year, there are over two dozen courses to choose from during the semester at Columbia Law School encompassing most international business law courses. In consultation with their adviser, Columbia Law School students may also earn credit for supervised research, participation in international journals or moot courts, and other scholarly work directly related to global business law and governance.

The semester in Paris focuses on comparative, international and European perspectives on legal issues. Past courses include Comparative Employment Discrimination Law, Comparative Labor Law, Economics in International Relations, European Contract Law, EU Competition Law, EU Institutional Law, Global Litigation and Conflicts of Laws, History of Legal Thought, Intellectual Property in a Global Perspective, International Arbitration, International Contracts, International Investment Law, Public Contracts in Legal Globalization, Tutorial Projects and WTO Case Law and Litigation.Special workshops and other experiential learning opportunities introduce students to front-line practitioners and leaders in business and government. Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne uses the ECTS credit system. Students enrolled in the Global Alliance programs are required to take 30 ECTS each semester. Students can expect to spend approximately 12 hours per week in a classroom. All courses are taught in small groups (between 15 and 30 students).

Language Instruction

All courses within the Global Alliance Programs are taught in English. However, Columbia Law School students may request to audit courses taught in French during their time abroad. Classes for those wishing to improve their French language skills are offered by partner schools in Paris. Columbia Law School, however, only awards credit for law courses.

Prerequisites or Co-requisites

» L6231 Corporations;
» L6269 International Law; or L6183 the U.S. and the International Legal System.

Course Load & Credit Hours

During the semester at Columbia Law School students must enroll in at least 12 credits from the menu of program courses. Because our Paris partners employ the ECTS credit system, students are required to take 30 ECTS credits during the Paris semester. They will receive 12 Columbia Law School credits upon successful completion of the program.

Attendance Policy & Grading Methods

Attendance is mandatory. Students are allowed two (2) excused absences per class (i.e., for medical reasons). Classes are conducted as both lectures and seminars. Classroom attendance is crucial for successful completion of courses, and is mandatory for some courses and seminars.

The French grading system employs a scale of 1 to 20, with 20 being the maximum. Students are evaluated based on in-class participation and the quality of written assignments (such as memos, case commentaries, dissertations, etc.). Final grades take into account the progress a student has made over the course of the semester. Students are given a passing grade (without distinction) with a combined average of 10 or above from all courses. Grades in the 16 (high honors) or 17 (very high honors) are rare. The grades earned abroad will not be listed on students’ Columbia transcripts; the Columbia transcript will only indicate the number of credits earned while participating in an international study abroad program.

Students must submit written reports on their coursework to Columbia every four weeks (one page per course).

Whenever possible, students' written work on examinations and papers will also be reviewed by Columbia after having been graded by the foreign institution.  Acceptance of any credit or grade for any course taken in the program is subject to determination by Columbia Law School.  Students will receive transcripts from Sciences Po and Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University. The grades earned abroad will not be listed on students' Columbia transcripts; the Columbia transcript will only indicate that students have earned 12 credits under the Global Alliance program.

Externships and Site Visits

The program in Paris includes scheduled cultural activities to French institutions, such as the Cour de Cassation, the Conseil d’État or the Conseil Constitutionnel, and to the International Chamber of Commerce.

Pro Bono

It may be possible, while studying abroad, to arrange work with a local organization that would qualify towards the fulfillment of the pro bono requirement. Please consult with Social Justice Initiatives for further information.

Degree Requirements

Participation in a Global Alliance Program does not exempt students from any requirements for the J.D. degree (i.e. profession of law, pro bono service, etc.).

Timeline

» Columbia University: Fall semester
» Paris, France: Spring semester

Students complete the program as a cohort, spending the Fall semester at Columbia Law School in New York City and the Spring semester in Paris at Sciences Po and Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne University. Columbia Law School students spend the Fall semester at Columbia Law School alongside the Paris cohort of students. All of the students then move to spend the Spring semester (January through April) in Paris. Participants are able to return in time for degree conferral in May. The Fall semester follows the same dates as the ordinary Columbia Law School semester while the Spring semester is from early January to mid April. The Spring semester is scheduled so that it does not interfere with eligibility for May graduation or the July bar examination.

Tuition & Fees

Columbia students will continue to pay Columbia tuition, health insurance, and health service fees. Other Columbia student activity fees will be waived. Students may be able to opt out of Columbia health insurance if appropriate alternative coverage is obtained. Consult the Office of International Programs for more.

Cost of Living

Students are responsible for the cost of living while abroad. These costs include travel to and from the foreign country, housing expenses, food, utilities, entertainment, and all other costs associated with study abroad. For more information visit the Office of International Programs to learn more about the costs of living in Paris. Students are required to purchase mandatory health coverage (approximately 215 euros for a year for students under the age of 28. Older students may pay more). This insurance is not offered through the university, but is a national health care service and there is no option for a waiver of this requirement. Columbia Law Students may be required to pay health insurance fees and health service fees at Columbia if appropriate alternative coverage is not obtained.

How to apply

Online applications for all international study abroad programs are open during the month of February each year.  

Columbia Law School Requires the Following:

  • Columbia Law School Study Abroad Application (including a Personal Statement)

  • Curriculum Vitae (uploaded to the online application)

  • The name of a Columbia Law School faculty member who can submit a brief recommendation

  • Official transcript (i.e., configure LawNet/Apply for Study Abroad/My Services to allow OIP access to your transcript)

Application materials required by Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

  • Cover Letter

  • Curriculum Vitae

  • Transcripts

  • Recommendation Letters

Contacts & More Information

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

International Programs
The office of International Programs is located at:
William and June Warren Hall (WJ)
1125 Amsterdam Avenue, 6th Floor

Audrey Baker
Director of International Student Exchange and Joint Degree Programs
Office of International and Comparative Law Programs, Columbia Law School
Office: William and June Warren Hall, Room 605
Phone: 212-854-8170
Email: ab602@columbia.edu

SCIENCES PO

Sciences Po Law School
Directeur Scientifique: Horatia Muir-Watt
Responsable pédagogique: Anne-Solenne de Roux

PARIS 1 PANTHEON-SORBONNE UNIVERSITY

Sorbonne Law School
Directrice: Helene Ruiz Fabri

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The J.D./M1 joint degree program at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University Law School is ideal for students who aspire to practice law in both the U.S. and France. It offers a complete course of study in both legal systems, affording students an extremely high measure of preparation for the transnational practice of law. Upon the successful completion of the four years of study, participants will receive the J.D. from Columbia and the Master 1 in French law from the Sorbonne. The aim of the program is to train lawyers who will be exceptionally well qualified to practice law on an international level. The program offers a complete course of study in both legal systems, affording students an extremely high measure of preparation for the transnational practice of law.

For Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne Students

This program consists of one year at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University and two years at Columbia Law School followed by another one year at Paris 1 to obtain the M1. Upon the successful completion of the four years of study, the participants receive the J.D. degree from Columbia and the Master in law from Paris 1 and qualify for admission to the bar examinations in the United States and in France. Thus, the number of years normally required for obtaining these degrees (3 years at Columbia and 5 years at Paris 1) is considerably reduced.

For Columbia Law Students

This program consists of completing 2 years at Columbia Law School, followed by 2 years at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University. Students would sign up for the 2-year program.

Please note: there is an option to convert it to 1 year in Paris and get an LLM.

This option is NOT available to Paris 1 students.

Language of Instruction

Columbia Law students are required to show proof of their French language proficiency as a part of the application process as the courses at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University are in French.

Timeline

Columbia Law School students can potentially shorten their time in Paris to one year, rather than two, if they petition to do so during their first semester at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. They then receive a J.D. and an LL.M., rather than an M1, and are not able to take the French bar exam.

The academic calendar runs roughly from mid-September to December (with exams in January), and late January through the end of June. Recommended arrival for students is during the first week of September for Orientation.

Tuition and Fees

Columbia students pay full tuition during the two years of the program at Columbia. For each year at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, students are required to pay 50 percent of the normal tuition fees. Other fees, including student activity fees, etc. will be waived. See below for information about health insurance and fees.

Cost of Living

Students are responsible for the cost of living while abroad. These costs include travel to and from the foreign country, housing expenses, food, utilities, entertainment, and all other costs associated with study abroad. Please consult with the Office of International Programs to learn more about the cost of living in Paris.

Housing

Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne does not have on-site housing facilities. However, students will be assisted in their housing search, and the school can sometimes arrange for accommodations in a student residence, which can be reserved in advance. Students accepted into the program will be given additional information.

Health Insurance

All students must be covered by the French National Student Health Insurance (Sécurité sociale) in order to qualify for full-time student status in France. Students under the age of 28 are required to purchase a student health coverage insurance (approximately 215 euros for a year). This insurance is not offered through the university, but is a national health care service and there is no option for a waiver of this requirement.

Students over the age of 28 are not eligible for this student health coverage. They must either purchase a mandatory health coverage at a slightly higher rate or prove that their existing insurance satisfies certain conditions. The Columbia insurance plan does satisfy these conditions and proof of this can be obtained and submitted with the original visa application. Columbia Law students may be required to pay health insurance fees and health service fees at Columbia if appropriate alternative coverage is not obtained.

Important note for international students (i.e., F1 visa holders)

Please be sure to speak with ISSO about the implications of an international joint degree program for your F1 visa status and OPT. As a general rule, if you spend your entire 3L year abroad and do not receive your degree in May of that year, your F1 status will end upon completion of your 2L year. Specific challenges and strategies may vary depending on nationality.

Academic Information

Columbia Law Students are required to maintain a full-time course load while studying abroad.  Students who are accepted into the Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne program will be given more specific information about course schedules, and the number of classes required to maintain a full-time schedule.

At Columbia Law School:

Students are expected to take all required Foundation courses in their first year. In the second year, students must take 31 credits of U.S. law.

At Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

In the first year in Paris, students take the courses taught to French students in the first and second years of law school. The curriculum at Paris focuses on private law courses, and has been organized to provide students with a solid grounding in French law and the majority of subjects covered in the Paris bar.

Panthéon-Sorbonne uses the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) to determine credits. A full-time course load consists of at least 30 ECTS per semester.

Grading System

Students are evaluated through formal written examinations and oral exams. Students receive numeric grades between zero and 20 for individual courses, which are then averaged together at the end of each year for a final grade. To receive a passing grade, and credit from Columbia Law School, students must score a 10 or higher. Students who fail to receive a passing grade (10) are allowed to retake exams in September.

Students who participate in one of the joint degree programs will receive transcripts from the partner school they attend. The grades earned abroad will not be listed on students’ Columbia transcripts. The Columbia transcript will indicate the number of credits earned while participating in an international study abroad program.

Pro Bono

It may be possible, while studying abroad, to arrange work with a local nongovernmental organization that would qualify towards the fulfillment of the pro bono requirement. Please consult with Social Justice Initiatives for further information.

Application Information

Online applications for all international study abroad programs are open during the month of February each year. Students who wish to enroll in one of the international joint degree programs should plan to apply in the spring semester of their 1L year in order to go abroad during their 3L (and in this case 4L) year. In early April, applicants will be informed if they have passed the initial screening. Follow-up interviews for selected students will also be conducted in French by a fluent French speaker in the Columbia community.

Columbia Law School Requires the following:

» Columbia Law School Study Abroad Application, including a Personal Statement
» Curriculum Vitae
» The name of a Columbia Law School faculty member who can submit a brief recommendation
» Official transcript (i.e., configure LawNet/Apply for Study Abroad/My Services to allow OIP access to your transcript).

Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne requires the following from Nominated Students:

For up-to-date information, please consult with Columbia Law School's Office of International Programs.

Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne Law School Online

École de droit de la Sorbonne

For more information

Visit the Office of International Programs in William and June Warren Hall, 6th Floor. There, you can view any additional information on file from our partner schools, as well as any relevant program evaluations that have been submitted by students who have participated in this and other study abroad programs.

Studying abroad has been very beneficial for many students who are considering a public interest career, but that the timing of overseas study may also present scheduling conflicts with regard to public interest hiring calendars. Please consult with Social Justice Initiatives to learn more.

For Columbia Law School interested in learning more, please contact:

Audrey Baker
Director of International Student Exchange and Joint Degree Programs
Office of International and Comparative Law Programs, Columbia Law School
Office: William and June Warren Hall, Room 605
Phone 212 854-8170
Email: ab602@columbia.edu

For Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne students interested in learning more, please contact:

Sophie D'Oliver
Email: Sophie.Robin-Olivier@univ-paris1.fr

Building on the complementary approaches of two prestigious institutions with rich and diverse academic traditions, Sciences Po’s Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA) and Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), both members of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA), offer a dual Master’s degree program in International Affairs. This Dual Master’s degree program is a two-year full time Master's Program, taught in both French and English. Spanning a wide range of disciplines, this program offers core courses in international relations, economics, and management and a large number of concentrations.

The curriculum blends international relations expertise and professional skills courses. It is designed to offer advanced education in the area of international affairs and to give students the opportunity to develop a top-level career in the private, public or non-profit sectors. No proficiency in French is required to study at PSIA. After two years, students will earn both SIPA's MIA and Sciences Po's Master’s degree.

The Dual Master's degree program in International Affairs is a highly selective program: between 15 and 20 students will be selected each year from applicants worldwide. All students will spend the first year in Paris at Sciences Po, acquiring core skills and a solid multidisciplinary base in a French educational context, and their second year in New York at SIPA, where they will be able to gain in‐depth specialization. During the full time of the program, students will be able to benefit from all resources and services (libraries, events, career services etc.) of both institutions.

The faculty involved in this program is comprised of internationally renowned academics and practitioners. By joining both the Columbia and Sciences Po communities, dual degree students will be able to benefit from the exceptionally stimulating intellectual environment of both institutions during the duration of the program, and as alumni, and to extend their networks and opportunities to both sides of the Atlantic.

Dual degree alumni are currently working in Paris, New York, London, Geneva, Copenhagen, Pristina and Sao Paulo at diverse institutions such as Goldman Sachs, the World Bank, Doctors without Borders, the European Commission, Air France, and Bloomberg LP.

For students who seek a financial orientation in international relations and who have French language proficiency, Sciences Po also offers a dual degree with SIPA in Finance and Strategy.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

Year 1 At Sciences Po

During the first year of the dual degree, students join one of the following specializations:

  • Master Sécurité internationale

  • Master Politique économique internationale

  • Master Management public international

  • Master Environnement, développement durable et risques

  • Master Finance et stratégie / International Business

FOR MORE INFORMATION

CORE COURSES
  1. Pre-Requisites for the dual degree

    • Students with sufficient background in economics HAVE TO take either "Guerre et paix" or "Sociologie des relations internationales" AND "Economie" over their year at Sciences Po (one class each semester).

    • Students with no background in economics HAVE TO take "Initiation à l'économie" AND "Guerre et paix" or "Sociologie des relations internationales" during the first semester, AND "Economie" during the second semester.

    • ALL students will have to take "Méthodes quantitatives".

    • Detailed descriptions of core courses are available on the Sciences Po website.

  2. Requisites for the Master's Program

    • MIA tracks

    • MFS tracks

    • Languages:
      All students (except native speakers and students coming from a French or English-speaking higher education institution) must take a language test in French and/or English at Sciences Po. If they do not reach the required level in French and/or English, they must take an advanced French and/or an English class at Sciences Po. They also have the option to take a foreign language class other than French or English.

    • Assessment:
      Students will have to complete at least 50 ECTS credits during their year at Sciences Po. Students who will not complete the required number of credits over the year will be asked to take extra courses in order to fulfil credit requirements.

    • Degree:
      Students will receive Sciences Po’s Master’s degree in international affairs or finance and strategy after completing their two years of studies and all requirements at the two institutions. A specific concentration can appear on their Master’s degree according to the courses completed at SIPA.

    • Academic calendar:
      The academic calendar at Sciences Po runs from mid-September to mid-January (fall semester) and from end of January to early June (spring semester), corresponding to two 12-week semesters. Dual degree students may attend the “Orientation Program” at Sciences Po before the beginning of courses.
      More information about the academic calendar is available here.
      More information about the Orientation Program is available here.

Year 2 At SIPA
POLICY CONCENTRATIONS

All students choose one concentration consisting of 5 courses: a policy field in which they wish to focus their studies at SIPA.

SPECIALIZATIONS

All students also choose one specialization consisting of 3 courses: a skill or area of specialized knowledge to pair with their policy concentration.

Core Curriculum

Students have to complete all requirements of the core curriculum of the MIA in addition to the core requirements of the Sciences Po MIA. Most of these requirements will be satisfied through courses taken during their first year of study at Sciences Po.

More information about the core curriculum is available here.

Courses and Electives

Students have to choose courses and electives in order to complete their chosen concentration. Students should be aware that most SIPA concentrations have prerequisites that should be completed during the first year at Sciences Po. Students who do not complete the concentration prerequisites during the first year will have a difficult time fulfilling all requirements for a concentration in their second year. Students can enroll in a limited number of classes in all Columbia departments, including the Business and Law schools and the School of Public Health.

More information is available here.

Foreign Languages

All dual degree students automatically meet their language proficiency requirement by their admission into the program. Any language courses taken at the intermediate level can count as electives.

Assessment

Students must successfully complete a minimum of 30 credits during their year at SIPA. Students failing to complete the number of credits and other requirements will be asked to take extra courses to fulfil their requirements by remaining an extra semester at Columbia.

Degree

Students will receive the Master's degree in International Affairs from SIPA after completing their two years of studies and all their requirements at the two institutions.

Academic Calendar

The academic year at SIPA typically runs from September to December and from January to May.

Eligibility

Each year, between 15 to 20 students will be selected worldwide to be part of the SIPA/Sciences Po MIA dual degree. Applicants do not have to be enrolled at SIPA or at Sciences Po to apply to the dual degree program.

Applicants must:

  • Hold an undergraduate diploma, irrespective of their area of studies, university or country of origin.

  • Demonstrate an excellent proficiency in French and in English.

This application is specific to the dual degree program and is not transferable to other programs at either institution. Students who wish to be considered for admission to other SIPA or Sciences Po programs must fulfill all relevant application requirements for those programs.

Successful applicants will be notified by email and mail.

For non native speakers:

  • Level 5 at the TCF (500 points) or DALF (C1 or C2) for French. Students must take one of these tests for their application to the dual degree, or provide a French Baccalauréat. More information here.

  • If you have been educated in a French speaking high school, you must attach a copy of your high school diploma. List of States considered French speaking : Andorre, Belgique, Bénin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroun, Canada (Québec), Centrafrique, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Gabon, Guinée, Luxembourg, Mali, Monaco, Niger, Sainte Lucie, Sénégal, Suisse francophone, Tchad, Togo.

  • TOEFL IBT 100 or IELTS 7, or any other diploma demonstrating an excellent proficiency in English. More information here.

Students applying for this dual degree program typically have prior professional experience (jobs or internships), an academic background in economics and/or social sciences, and quantitative skills.

How to apply

  • For Sciences Po students and students who have completed an undergraduate degree in France, click here.

  • For students who have completed an undergraduate degree outside of France, click here.

Contacts

At Sciences Po:

At SIPA

  • Mona Khalidi, Assistant Dean, School of International and Public Affairs: mk2388@columbia.edu

  • Urbano Garza, Senior Assistant Dean, School of International and Public Affairs: utg1@columbia.edu

Study in Paris and New York and obtain Master’s Degrees from both Sciences Po Paris and the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA)

Sciences Po and Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) share the conviction that professional education built around public and international policy studies is solid preparation for a wide array of careers. Building on the complementary approaches of two prestigious institutions with rich and diverse academic traditions, Sciences Po and SIPA offer a two-year full time Dual Master’s degree program in International Affairs, taught in both French and English.

Having the opportunity to study in Paris and New York, students obtain both Sciences Po and SIPA’s Master’s degrees in the same amount of time it takes to earn one degree. Spanning a wide range of disciplines, this unique opportunity offers core courses in international relations, economics, and management and a large number of concentrations.

All students will spend the first year in Paris at PSIA, acquiring core skills and a solid multidisciplinary base, and their second year in New York at SIPA, where they will be able to gain in-depth specialization.

After two years, students will earn both SIPA's MIA and Sciences Po's Master’s degree. Dual Degree holders will join the ranks of an exceptional set of transatlantic professionals, forging a growing network of internationally trained decision-makers.

Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid

Students pay the tuition and fees at the school where they are in residence. Dual Degree students will pay Sciences Po tuition and fees in their first year, and SIPA tuition and fees in their second. Students must be enrolled in Columbia University health insurance or have comparable insurance coverage when they are at Columbia during their second year.

For students needing U.S. federal student aid, they should contact SIPA financial aid to begin the process. 2016-17 tuition and fees below:

Columbia SIPA MIA: $54,000

Sciences Po MIA: €13, 900

Columbia Fees | Sciences Po PSIA Fees

The application process

Candidates must apply through the PSIA website. Applications for 2017-18 are open until January 20, 2017. Candidates are notified of the outcome of their applications two to three months after the deadline.

Candidates may apply here.

For more updated information on the Sciences Po/SIPA MIA dual degree program, please go to http://www.sciencespo.fr/psia/content/dual-degree-columbia-university.

Eligibility

The Dual Master’s degree program in International Affairs is a highly selective program: only 20 students will be selected each year, among applications received worldwide. Necessary qualifications are advanced (near fluent) French language skills, and a well-articulated rationale for the joint program of study.

Scholarship

Jerome Lohez Foundation Scholarship

For further information

At SIPA

More information can be found here.

Contact

Urbano Garza, Senior Assistant Dean, School of International and Public Affairs: utg1@columbia.edu

At PSIA

More information can be found here.

Contact

Audrey Giacomini, Academic Advisor: audrey.giacomini@sciencespo.fr

One-year PSIA MDP for Experienced Development Practitioners

Directed towards professionals with substantial work experience (at least five years’ of full-time, non-internship work), the program endows students with the substantive knowledge required to analyze and address cross-sector challenges to development, such as malnutrition, absolute poverty, energy regulation, climate change and infectious disease control.

The Master in Development Practice (MDP) has been described as “the development practitioner’s executive MBA,” according to the International Commission of Education for Sustainable Development Practice, providing a top-notch academic experience during the course of one year. Integrating the core disciplines of health sciences, natural sciences and social sciences, the Master in Development Practice (MDP) is an innovative, cross-disciplinary graduate degree program supported by a grant from the MacArthur Foundation.

The PSIA MDP one-year program is structured according to the guidelines formulated by the International Commission on Education for Sustainable Development Practice, while at the same time, offers the dynamic pedagogical process that is the hallmark of the Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA), enabling students to customize their curriculum, reflecting their own specific learning and professional objectives related to development practice. PSIA MDP students have access to over 150 courses per year, within the context of the Master in Advanced Global Studies.

While at PSIA, all students acquire interdisciplinary knowledge and practical skills and work in cross-cultural teams transnationally within their diverse cohort and through the MDP Global Network. The program’s intersectoral approach enables graduates to work across various sectors to design and manage integrated development interventions, and to implement appropriate policies to support sustainable development. Students have the opportunity to participate in a collaborative seminar with the French Development Agency or to attend an international development forum as part of a professional simulation.

Program Features

PSIA MDP students, on average, have 5 to 7 years of professional experience before entering the one-year program (in development or in another field).  More junior candidates are invited to apply to the two-year Master of International Development.

MDP students include sector-based practitioners, policy administrators, private-sector professionals, and educators, with the shared objective of broadening their knowledge base to understand complex interactions between sectors of development practice.

MDP students participate in the Global MDP Network of 24 universities around the world, engage with guest lecturers from various development organizations through the PSIA’s speaker series, and interact with other MDP students through collaborative virtual learning in the Global Classroom course. The one-year MDP includes a one-week Bootcamp in August, two full semesters, a short course in January, and two months of academic work in the summer.  At the end of the one-year academic component, students return to full-time work or pursue a newly-acquired area of expertise should they be in exploring another sector of sustainable development practice.  

Acquiring interdisciplinary knowledge and practical skills enables graduates to work across various sectors to design and manage integrated development interventions and to implement appropriate policies and draw from specialist expertise to support sustainable development.

One of the great assets of PSIA’s MDP program is the exceptional quality of its students.  They bring a wealth of knowledge that reflects the strength of their diversity not only in culture and origins but in real-life development experiences.  It is always more than a pleasure to interact with them.
- Charles Oman, PSIA MDP Faculty and Former Director of Research, OECD Development Center

Please visit the MDP Global Association, which includes all programs offering a Master's in Development Practice (MDP), situated at universities around the world, and a broad range of MDP collaborating organizations.

Career Opportunities

The one-year MDP Program at PSIA is designed to provide the necessary knowledge and skills for development practitioners, policy professionals at the local and national level, private sector professionals, and high-level project managers. The one-year PSIA MDP program is directed towards young professionals with previous substantial work experience who want to acquire new competences and skills and to become  part of a new generation of generalist practitioners prepared to confront complex sustainable development challenges and able to innovate, to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) after 2015.

Programs

Fall courses - 2015-2016

Spring courses - 2015-2016 | Download Schedule, Spring semester (PDF - 284 Ko)

Summer courses - 2014-2015

Tuition Fees and MDP Scholarship Opportunities

Tuition fees for the MDP are 21,000 euros, for the entire one-year course of study (including the one-week August bootcamp, two full academic semesters, a January intersession, and the summer session). The same fees apply for both EU and non-EU residents.

On a competitive basis, a limited number of scholarships are awarded each year to MDP (Master in Development Practice) candidates (who are not eligible for the Emile Boutmy scholarship). These scholarships are awarded on the basis of need as well as merit. They range from partial to full tuition remission, and are valid for study at Sciences Po upon sufficient academic performance (top 50% of class). Should students not maintain these academic standards, their scholarship may be revoked. MDP scholarships do not cover living expenses, books, or field training.

Other MDP funding opportunities include the AFD scholarship and the Joint Japan/World Bank scholarship.

How to apply

Applications for the September 2017 intake are now being welcomed. Applicants can apply via the Admissions platform.

Deadline for international graduate admissions: March, 2017. Please check above for specific deadlines.

Admission decisions are announced on a rolling basis, from December through mid-June of every year. The specific date depends on when the application was submitted and may take up to 3 months to be declared. The earlier you submit your application, the sooner you will receive an answer from Sciences Po.

Contacts

Scientific Advisor: Laurence Tubiana
Academic Advisor: Kate Vivian

Because of the changes in journalism, the quick evolution of techniques, and the constant broadening of trainings, Sciences Po and Columbia want to find a way to face those challenges and offer a unique international program for journalism. These two prestigious Schools want to put their assets together to introduce students to all types of media standards and methods, be they French, European, or Anglo‐Saxon.

They also want them to master journalism techniques better, to be trained in two different languages, and to benefit from an unprecedented international exposure.

Both institutions work together to offer students a practical approach to journalism as well as high‐quality intellectual training taught by journalists, key players on the international scene, and university teachers. Students are trained to enter national and international newsrooms on a “globalized” labor market.

Students attend a two‐year course, and spend one year in each School of journalism.

An Internationally Recognized Program In Journalism

Columbia and Sciences Po believe students will benefit greatly from a program that enables them to study in two hubs of journalism: New York City and Paris. This partnership reflects the global nature of journalism in the 21st century, offering students top-tier training from both an American and a European perspective. It provides mastery of journalistic techniques, bilingual training, and the opportunity to develop a career with a unique international perspective. Students spend a year each in New York and Paris and receive master's degrees in Journalism from both Columbia University and Sciences Po. The students enrolled in the Dual Degree program will spend their first year acquiring core skills either at Sciences Po or at Columbia. During the second year, they will be enrolled in the master's program at their host school across the Atlantic.

Program Overview

The two-year, full-time dual master's degree program in Journalism is taught in French at Sciences Po and in English at Columbia. The program offers a wide range of courses which blend work in the social sciences (e.g. International Relations, Economics, European Studies, Political History) with professional skills (TV, radio, multimedia, print).

The program is highly selective. Up to 10 students will be selected each year, 5 from each institution. Only students enrolled in one of the journalism programs at Columbia or Sciences Po will be able to apply to the dual program. Columbia students will be invited during the academic year to apply for a second degree, which will be conferred by Sciences Po after two semesters of study and internship in Paris. Students at Sciences Po apply to Columbia during their first year. Each school will use its normal admission process. There will be a representative from each partner school participating in the final selection process. Students will pay regular tuition rates at each institution. After two years of study, and provided that the appropriate credits have been completed at both institutions, Sciences Po students will receive both the Sciences Po and the Columbia University master's degrees in Journalism. Columbia graduates will receive the Sciences Po degree once they've completed their work there.

The faculty members in both programs are internationally renowned academics and journalists. At Columbia and Sciences Po, dual degree students will benefit from two exceptionally stimulating intellectual environments as well as community networks and opportunities on both sides of the Atlantic. The students participating in the program will have access to all facilities normally offered to students at each university, including libraries, computer networks, career services, sports facilities, and student associations and cultural life.

Eligibility

Proficiency both in French and in English is required to participate in this program. Applicants should:

  • Hold an undergraduate diploma (minimum 6 semesters) or the equivalent of a U.S. bachelor’s degree, irrespective of their area of studies, university or country of origin.

  • Demonstrate an excellent proficiency in French and English by taking one of the following tests:

    • Sciences Po requirement for non-native French speakers: Level 5 on the Test de Connaissance du Français (TCF) (500 points), which is administered by the French Ministry of Education or Diplome Approfondi de Langue Francaise (DALF) for French. Applicants must submit scores from one of these tests or provide a French Baccalauréat or any other diploma in French demonstrating a good level of French;
      Note: If you have been educated in a French speaking high school, you must attach a copy of your high school diploma. List of French-speaking countries: Andorra, Belgium, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameron, Canada (Quebec), Central African Republic, Republic of Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Gabon, Republic of Guinea, Luxembourg, Mali, Monaco, Niger, Saint Lucia, Senegal, French-speaking Switzerland, Chad, Togo.

    • Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism requirement for non-native English speakers: Either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) is required. Required TOEFL scores are 650 on the paper-based test, 280 on the computer-based test, or 114 on the Internet-based test. Information about registering for the TOEFL is available at www.toefl.org. Alternatively, a score of 8.5 on the IELTS is required. Information about registering for the IELTS is available at www.ielts.org.

Deadlines

For Year 1 in Paris and Year 2 in New York: All applications must be submitted online by November 17, and all supporting documents must be received by December 1.
For Year 1 in New York and Year 2 in Paris: All applications must be fully submitted by December.

How to apply

Applicants who would like to spend the first year at Columbia and the second year at Sciences Po must be enrolled in the M.S. program at the Columbia Journalism School in order to be considered. Applicants who would like to spend the first year at Sciences Po and the second year at Columbia must be enrolled at the Sciences Po Journalism School and apply to Columbia during their academic year.

Application Process

Students attending the Master's degree in journalism at Columbia University or at Sciences Po University are the only ones who can apply for the dual degree. They must do so during their first academic year.

Year 1 In New York, Year 2 In Paris

Columbia University's students have to apply on Sciences Po University's applications website and send their application before December 1.

Applications will be reviewed by a common jury in December.

Year 1 In Paris, Year 2 In New York

Students attending Sciences Po School of journalism can apply for the dual diploma by filling the application form for Columbia University online. They have to apply in December.

Application Results

Applications will be reviewed mid-December by a joint Admissions Board comprised of representatives from Columbia and Sciences Po. Up to ten students are selected every year, five from Sciences Po School of journalism and five from Columbia University.

Successful applicants will be notified by email and on the universities’ websites at the beginning of January.

Contacts and Useful Links

At Sciences Po
Contacts:
Useful links:

Information for prospective master’s students at Sciences Po:

At Columbia
Contacts:
Useful links:

The dual MA degree program offers students a unique opportunity to learn from two of the best Art History graduate programs in the world. Students spend one semester at the partner institution during their second year. Columbia students will usually travel in the Fall, while Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne students will usually spend the Spring at Columbia. During their semester abroad, all students will follow a regular full-course semester and will complete necessary requirements regarding the MA thesis.

Upon completion of the program, students earn an MA in Art History or in Modern Art: Critical and Curatorial Studies from Columbia University, and an MA in Art History from Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University (spécialité "Histoire de l'Art", spécialité "Histoire et Politique des Musées et du Patrimoine" or spécialité "Archéologie des périodes historiques.").  

Eligibility

The program is open to Columbia University students currently enrolled full-time in the first year of the MA in Art History or the MA in Modern Art: Critical and Curatorial Studies.

Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne students must refer to the UFR03 Histoire de l’art et archéologie website to check your eligibility.

Application Procedure And Timeline For 2016-17

  • Columbia University students must submit their application in person to the Graduate Program Coordinator in 826 Schermerhorn Hall, by April 14, 2017.

  • Paris 1 Panthéon- Sorbonne students: Please refer to the UFR03 Histoire de l’art et archéologie website to check the application procedure and timeline

Application Materials For Columbia Students (All Documents Must Be In English)
  • Curriculum Vitae (2 pages maximum)

  • Statement (500 words maximum) explaining how the program will advance the student's research and career goals. Students should also indicate potential thesis advisors.

  • Copy of transcripts of all post-secondary education

  • One letter of recommendation from a Columbia professor (to be sent directly by email to the Graduate Program Coordinator)

  • Demonstrated language proficiency. Columbia students must demonstrate proficiency in French. To do so, they must pass the DALF (C1 level). For information on the DALF exam, including the exam schedule, please visit Alliance Française. Note that the DALF exam is usually offered only once or twice a year, so please plan ahead.

Application for Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne students: please refer to the UFR03 Histoire de l’art et archéologie website to check the application materials.

Contact And Information

For all inquiries, you may write to ahar-dualdegree@columbia.edu.

École Polytechnique accepts doctoral students in Earth and Environmental Sciences for one-semester research visits and for the Fluid Dynamics of Sustainability and the Environment summer school.

Contact

DGS in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences: 

Goran Ekstrom
E-mail: ekstrom@ldeo.columbia.edu